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Thread: Zionuts

  1. #61
    Jeremiah Wright is one example - passionately leftist, but believes that Jewish control of American foreign policy (particularly in Israel/Palestine and Iraq, driven by neoconservative/Jewish ideology) has led America astray. He's just the latest of a long list of similar-sounding people. A lot of the anti-'fat cat banker' sentiment veers into anti-Jewish tropes at times, too. The comment pages of the Guardian's articles on the Middle East are full of this kind of rhetoric - so is Indymedia, both of which are ardently leftist publications. This is generally where the loony left and the loony right start to look more and more alike - oh, they advocate entirely different policies, but they both like to blame the Jews, albeit from opposite ends of the spectrum.

    edit: Oh! I forgot all about the New World Order conspiracy bullshit and the anti-globalization thing. Liberal (and libertarian) chic, but full of portentous conspiracy theories about some secret cabal trying to take over the world... kinda an updated Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

  2. #62
    Nihilist Nessus's Avatar
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    Fair enough. Stalin's as left as they go, and he hated the Jews too. I suppose I just forgot the left had other loonies than the Greens and communists.
    In the future, the Berlin wall will be a mile high, and made of steel. You too will be made to crawl, to lick children's blood from jackboots. There will be no creativity, only productivity. Instead of love there will be fear and distrust, instead of surrender there will be submission. Contact will be replaced with isolation, and joy with shame. Hope will cease to exist as a concept. The Earth will be covered with steel and concrete. There will be an electronic policeman in every head. Your children will be born in chains, live only to serve, and die in anguish and ignorance.
    The universe we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil, no good, nothing but blind, pitiless indifference.

  3. #63
    Oh, some of the communists also blame the Jews (which is funny because the far right blames the Jews for communism, but whatever). Something about orchestrating the capitalist system and all. I wish I had a piece of that.

  4. #64
    Nihilist Nessus's Avatar
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    You're just saying that because you have it!
    In the future, the Berlin wall will be a mile high, and made of steel. You too will be made to crawl, to lick children's blood from jackboots. There will be no creativity, only productivity. Instead of love there will be fear and distrust, instead of surrender there will be submission. Contact will be replaced with isolation, and joy with shame. Hope will cease to exist as a concept. The Earth will be covered with steel and concrete. There will be an electronic policeman in every head. Your children will be born in chains, live only to serve, and die in anguish and ignorance.
    The universe we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil, no good, nothing but blind, pitiless indifference.

  5. #65
    Shhh, don't tell, my Jewish neighbors and I are saving up to buy Canada.

  6. #66

  7. #67
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    Although...what is up with that logo?

  8. #68
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    Holy fucking shit, Reuters.


    This might be the most politically correct thing I've seen.

    Bombing near Jerusalem bus stop kills woman, 30 hurt

    By Crispian Balmer
    JERUSALEM | Wed Mar 23, 2011 7:40pm GMT
    (Reuters) - A bomb planted in a bag exploded near a bus stop in a Jewish district of Jerusalem on Wednesday, killing a woman and injuring at least 30 people, in an attack police blamed on Palestinian militants.

    No one claimed responsibility for the blast, which coincided with an upsurge of violence on the Gaza border that has led to fears of a new war between Israel and the Islamist group Hamas, which governs the Gaza Strip, after months of relative quiet.

    Medics said three people were seriously hurt by the explosion, which hit one of the main routes into central Jerusalem in the afternoon, shattering the windows of a nearby bus. A woman in her 60s died in hospital.

    Police said it was a "terrorist attack" -- Israel's term for a Palestinian strike. It was the first time Jerusalem had been hit by such a bomb since 2004.

    Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned that Israel would take action against those groups who he said are testing the Jewish state's will to defend itself.

    "Israel will act aggressively, responsibly and wisely to preserve the quiet and security that prevailed here over the past two years," Netanyahu said.

    In the Gaza, a Hamas spokesman said the group, which does not recognise Israel's right to exist, was seeking to reverse the recent rise in violence and "to protect stability and to work in order to restore the conditions on ground."

    World leaders condemned the bombing, as well as a flurry of rockets and mortars fired from Gaza into Israel in recent days.

    "The United States calls on the groups responsible to end these attacks at once and we underscore that Israel, like all nations, has a right to self-defence," U.S. President Barack Obama said in a statement released in Washington.

    Palestinian Authority leaders in the West Bank, who are opposed to Hamas, also denounced the attack.

    "I condemn this terrorist operation in the strongest possible terms, regardless of who was behind it," Prime Minister Salam Fayyad said in a statement.

    At the height of a Palestinian uprising that began in 2000, but which died out in recent years, militants carried out dozens of often deadly bombings in Jewish neighbourhoods of Jerusalem.

    Internal Security Minister Yitzhak Aharonovitch said the bomb weighed about one or two kilos (2 or 4 pounds). "It exploded in a small suitcase on the sidewalk next to the bus stop," he told Israel's Channel Two television.

    Blood stained the pavement and many people had to be treated for shock. Israeli television broke into normal programming to show scores of ambulances converging on the scene, taking the injured to nearby hospitals.

    "I saw two women lying on the ground, unconscious and covered in blood," medic Motti Bukchi, who arrived swiftly on the scene, told Channel Two.

    PEACE IMPASSE

    Peace talks aimed at ending the decades-old conflict between Israel and the Palestinians broke down last year after Netanyahu refused to extend a partial freeze on Jewish settlement building in the occupied West Bank.

    Israeli security officials have cautioned that the absence of any peace initiative could spark a new Palestinian revolt. Over 500 Israeli civilians died in 140 Palestinian suicide bomb attacks from 2000 to 2007. More than 4,500 Palestinians were killed by Israeli forces in the same period.

    U.S. Defence Secretary Robert Gates, on a visit to Cairo, denounced what he called "a horrific terrorist attack" but said he did not think the situation in Israel was deteriorating.

    Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Elaraby urged Israel to show restraint and said no one should give it an excuse to use violence -- an apparent reference to Palestinian militants.

    Netanyahu delayed his departure on a trip to Russia by several hours on Wednesday to consult with security officials, but declined to cancel the trip altogether.

    Earlier, the prime minister had warned Hamas over rising violence in Gaza. Hamas says its attacks this past week have been in response to recent Israeli bombings and killings.

    On Tuesday, Israeli strikes in the Gaza Strip killed four Palestinian civilians, including three children playing football, and five militants, medical officials said.

    Netanyahu has voiced regret for the civilian deaths but said Israel could not ignore attacks on its territory.

    "It could be that this matter will entail exchanges of blows, and it may take a certain period of time, but we are very determined to strike at the terrorist elements and deny them the means of attacking our citizens," he told parliament.

    Israel launched a three-week war on the impoverished coastal enclave in 2009, killing about 1,400 Palestinians and drawing heavy international censure. Hamas, which seized control of Gaza in a 2007 coup, had mostly held fire since then.

    http://uk.reuters.com/article/2011/0...72M3S520110323

  9. #69
    CNN and others did the same thing with the attack in Itamar last week on the Fogel family. *yawns*

  10. #70
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    Really? In this case, Reuters is deliberately trying to downplay the idea that this was a terror attack. Calling something like this an "attack" is one thing, but Reuters taking the time to snort their nose at the label "terrorist attack" seems a bit new.

  11. #71
    Senior Member Flixy's Avatar
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    Really? Any news whatsoever here called it a terror attack.
    Keep on keepin' the beat alive!

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by Dreadnaught View Post
    Really? In this case, Reuters is deliberately trying to downplay the idea that this was a terror attack. Calling something like this an "attack" is one thing, but Reuters taking the time to snort their nose at the label "terrorist attack" seems a bit new.
    The language wasn't quite as snarky, but it was still there and occasioned comment from the Israeli government (I know that Israeli papers picked up the Reuters thing you quote, but I don't know if the GPO bothered with it):

    Quote Originally Posted by JPost
    GPO slams CNN for description of Itamar 'terror attack'
    By HERB KEINON
    03/13/2011 22:12

    The director of Israel's Government Press Office sent a letter to CNN's Jerusalem Bureau Chief Sunday demanding an apology for a story on CNN's website that put "terror attack" in quotations in the headline of its story on Friday night's atrocity in Itamar.

    Responding to the story headlined "Israeli Family of 5 Killed in 'Terror Attack,' Military Says," Oren Helman wrote Kevin Flower that he was "dumbfounded and astonished" to read that the slaughter of the Fogel family is "what the Israeli army calls a 'terrorist attack'."

    "Your remarks sound as if we are talking about an IDF 'claim' that this was 'a terrorist attack' and that this is not necessarily the case," he wrote. "If this is not a terrorist attack, then what is?"

    Helman, saying that "there is a limit to the extent of objectivity regarding such a horrific deed," wrote that an apology from CNN was in order.

    CNN International, in response, said that it does not respond in public to private correspondence. The news organization did issue a statement saying, however, that it was "standard journalistic practice for news organizations to put quotation marks around remarks attributed to third parties."
    http://www.jpost.com/DiplomacyAndPol...aspx?id=211996

    The original CNN article is here, but I think it's been edited; I recall distinctly there being quotes in the headline:
    http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/meast/...led/index.html

  13. #73
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    I think CNN is much less of a likely offender on this -- for every instance of this (which was changed) I imagine we'll see many instances of CNN calling a civilian bombing like this a terror attack, no matter where it is.

    Reuters on the other hand...we'll just have to wait and see. Sorta sad Charles Johnson doesn't focus on this stuff anymore.

  14. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Dreadnaught View Post
    I think CNN is much less of a likely offender on this -- for every instance of this (which was changed) I imagine we'll see many instances of CNN calling a civilian bombing like this a terror attack, no matter where it is.
    I agree with you in that Reuters is generally worse. But CNN does some things that annoy me - for a long time, they make a point of saying only that 'The US, EU, Quartet, and Israel' consider Hamas a terrorist organization. I get that labels are loaded with meaning and a newspaper doesn't want to appear biased. But the truth isn't biased; there's no shades of grey on this one (any more than there are that the murder of the Fogel family or the bombing of a bus stop are both terrorist acts).

  15. #75
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    Oh Alan...

    OPINION MARCH 29, 2011
    Norway to Jews: You're Not Welcome Here
    Anti-Semitism doesn't even mask itself as anti-Zionism.

    By ALAN M. DERSHOWITZ

    I recently completed a tour of Norwegian universities, where I spoke about international law as applied to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. But the tour nearly never happened.

    Its sponsor, a Norwegian pro-Israel group, offered to have me lecture without any charge to the three major universities. Norwegian universities generally jump at any opportunity to invite lecturers from elsewhere. When my Harvard colleague Stephen Walt, co-author of "The Israel Lobby," came to Norway, he was immediately invited to present a lecture at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. Likewise with Ilan Pappe, a demonizer of Israel who teaches at Oxford.

    My hosts expected, therefore, that their offer to have me present a different academic perspective on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict would be eagerly accepted. I have written half a dozen books on the subject presenting a centrist view in support of the two-state solution. But the universities refused.

    The dean of the law faculty at Bergen University said he would be "honored" to have me present a lecture "on the O.J. Simpson case," as long as I was willing to promise not to mention Israel. An administrator at the Trondheim school said that Israel was too "controversial."

    The University of Oslo simply said "no" without offering an excuse. That led one journalist to wonder whether the Norwegian universities believe that I am "not entirely house-trained."

    Only once before have I been prevented from lecturing at universities in a country. The other country was Apartheid South Africa.

    Despite the faculties' refusals to invite me, I delivered three lectures to packed auditoriums at the invitation of student groups. I received sustained applause both before and after the talks.

    It was then that I realized why all this happened. At all of the Norwegian universities, there have been efforts to enact academic and cultural boycotts of Jewish Israeli academics. This boycott is directed against Israel's "occupation" of Palestinian land—but the occupation that the boycott supporters have in mind is not of the West Bank but rather of Israel itself. Here is the first line of their petition: "Since 1948 the state of Israel has occupied Palestinian land . . ."

    The administrations of the universities have refused to go along with this form of collective punishment of all Israeli academics, so the formal demand for a boycott failed. But in practice it exists. Jewish pro-Israel speakers are subject to a de facto boycott.

    The first boycott signatory was Trond Adresen, a professor at Trondheim. About Jews, he has written: "There is something immensely self-satisfied and self-centered at the tribal mentality that is so prevalent among Jews. . . . [They] as a whole, are characterized by this mentality. . . . It is no less legitimate to say such a thing about Jews in 2008-2009 than it was to make the same point about the Germans around 1938."

    This line of talk—directed at Jews, not Israel—is apparently acceptable among many in Norway's elite. Consider former Prime Minister Kare Willock's reaction to President Obama's selection of Rahm Emanuel as his first chief of staff: "It does not look too promising, he has chosen a chief of staff who is Jewish." Mr. Willock didn't know anything about Mr. Emanuel's views—he based his criticism on the sole fact that Mr. Emanuel is a Jew. Perhaps unsurprisingly, fewer than 1,000 Jews live in Norway today.

    The country's foreign minister recently wrote an article justifying his contacts with Hamas. He said that the essential philosophy of Norway is "dialogue." That dialogue, it turns out, is one-sided. Hamas and its supporters are invited into the dialogue, but supporters of Israel are excluded by an implicit, yet very real, boycott against pro-Israel views.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...887244764.html

  16. #76
    Y'know, I hate to say it but Dershowitz is getting loonier as time goes on.

  17. #77
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    Agreed. Though he does have a point that being asked to come to a university and not speak about Israel -- when I'm sure plenty of people come to speak on behalf of Palestinians -- does speak to a kind of soft boycott.

  18. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Dreadnaught View Post
    Agreed. Though he does have a point that being asked to come to a university and not speak about Israel -- when I'm sure plenty of people come to speak on behalf of Palestinians -- does speak to a kind of soft boycott.
    Maybe, but let's be honest. Dershowitz is famous not for his expertise on Israel but for his (admittedly impressive) legal credentials. He's both a scholar and a famous trial lawyer who has worked with a number of celebrity clients. This is why most people want to hear him speak; not to hear his opinions on the Middle East conflict.

    In contrast, the other two people he mentioned - Ilan Pappe and Stephen Walt - have at least peripheral connections between their scholarship and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Pappe is a historian who focuses on Israeli-Palestinian history (albeit as a revisionist). Walt is a world renowned political scientist whose work has touched on how internal lobbies can effect foreign policy. I don't agree with much of what they say, but there is a connection between their area of scholarship and Israel.

    Dershowitz is essentially a demagogue (much as I hate to admit it) who uses his fame as a legal scholar to preach about Israel. Universities choosing to focus on his scholarship rather than his political positions is not wholly unreasonable.

    Of course, I don't doubt there are some serious issues with how Israel is dealt with in Norway (at least from the news reports I've seen), and there also continue to be the occasional anti-semitic incident or remark. But this doesn't really represent such a case.

  19. #79
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    I mostly agree except that he is a renowned legal scholar who usually approaches his demagoguery from the perspective of the law. That someone of his stature is told, "don't talk about Israel" when we know so many people are probably speaking about the issue at Norge universitot is one of those soft signals that the dialogue just isn't open.

  20. #80
    *shrugs* Fair enough. Dershowitz just makes me uncomfortable.

  21. #81
    All Worship Ragnarök Loki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiggin View Post
    In contrast, the other two people he mentioned - Ilan Pappe and Stephen Walt - have at least peripheral connections between their scholarship and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Pappe is a historian who focuses on Israeli-Palestinian history (albeit as a revisionist). Walt is a world renowned political scientist whose work has touched on how internal lobbies can effect foreign policy. I don't agree with much of what they say, but there is a connection between their area of scholarship and Israel.
    I disagree. Dershowitz has written more about Israel, and that work is of at least the same caliber as Walt's work on Israel (and interest groups). And that has more to do with how poor Walt's work is (academically) than it does about the quality of Dershowitz' work.
    Hope is the denial of reality

  22. #82
    I agree that Walt's work on Israel was flawed, but he presents his work on that in the context of political science. Dershowitz's most famous book on the issue, "The Case for Israel", is not presented as a legal work but rather as a political commentary. *shrugs* Honestly it doesn't matter much to me either way; I just think that giving them the benefit of the doubt is theoretically possible. Granted, I sincerely doubt that their refusal was as noble as I'm suggesting it might be, but I want to distinguish between what their likely reasons were, and whether there are any legitimate grounds for preferring Dershowitz talk about his legal (and scholarly) career and not his advocacy (and political) career.

  23. #83
    All Worship Ragnarök Loki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiggin View Post
    I agree that Walt's work on Israel was flawed, but he presents his work on that in the context of political science.
    No he doesn't. Him and Mearsheimer admitted that the book is meant for a general audience and not academia. They also fall well short of even minimal scientific standards of poli sci. It is little more than an attempted hitjob against Israel and its supporters. Let's just say that Dershowitz' work is closer to the ideals of History than the Lobby is to the ideals of poli sci.

    Dershowitz's most famous book on the issue, "The Case for Israel", is not presented as a legal work but rather as a political commentary. *shrugs* Honestly it doesn't matter much to me either way; I just think that giving them the benefit of the doubt is theoretically possible. Granted, I sincerely doubt that their refusal was as noble as I'm suggesting it might be, but I want to distinguish between what their likely reasons were, and whether there are any legitimate grounds for preferring Dershowitz talk about his legal (and scholarly) career and not his advocacy (and political) career.
    Even the people I know who support the conclusion of the Lobby (and praise Walt for writing the book; Mearsheimer pissed off too many people over the years) admit that it's a horrible piece of research. I have literally read undergraduate essays that were of a higher caliber.
    Hope is the denial of reality

  24. #84
    All Worship Ragnarök Loki's Avatar
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    Hope is the denial of reality

  25. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by Loki View Post
    Is the publishing date an indication of the article's authenticity? Sleep deprived as I am, I find it hard to determine.

  26. #86
    All Worship Ragnarök Loki's Avatar
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    No, it's valid. Plenty of stories about it.
    Hope is the denial of reality

  27. #87
    So I just wasted 5 minutes trying to find wit where there was none?

    Still better than this god damned lab report, though.

  28. #88
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    This is actually a sad one. Pro-Palestinian ISMer (ISM generally fill the ranks of Western useful idiots in Palestine) is abducted by radical group and hung.

    I mean seriously, what the shit.

    April 15, 2011

    Hamas Says It Found Body of Italian Activist

    By FARES AKRAM

    GAZA — The Hamas group that rules Gaza said early on Friday that it had found the body of a pro-Palestinian Italian activist a day after a radical, Al Qaeda-inspired Islamic organization said it kidnapped him to press demands for the release of its imprisoned leader.

    The group that claimed the abduction, known as Tawhid and Jihad, had threatened to execute the Italian unless Hamas released the leader by 5 p.m. on Friday. But Palestinian officials said Hamas police officers stormed a house where the man was being held and found his body after a clash with his kidnappers. The police officials said he had been hanged, The Associated Press reported.

    According to a friend who was in touch with him by e-mail, the Italian, Vittorio Arrigoni, was abducted on the day he planned to leave Gaza complaining of exhaustion. “I am very tense, exhausted, if they don’t kill anyone in the next 24 hours, I am getting out Thursday. Your V.,” he wrote on Monday to a friend in Italy, Daniela Loffreda, Ms. Loffreda said in a telephone interview.

    He had been thinking of returning to Italy for some time for family and health reasons but had stayed as the situation in Gaza worsened in recent weeks. “Morally, he just couldn’t leave,” Ms. Loffreda said. The Tawhid and Jihad group had released a video on Thursday that described the captive as “Victor, an Italian journalist” and called for the release of its supporters and other global jihadists.

    The International Solidarity Movement, a pro-Palestinian activist organization with foreign volunteers in the West Bank and Gaza, had said Mr. Arrigoni, 36, was one of the movement’s activists in Gaza. Anna Stevens, a representative of the Palestinian-led movement in the West Bank city of Ramallah, said by telephone Thursday that Mr. Arrigoni was the man in the video, and that the movement’s contacts in Gaza confirmed that he had been kidnapped.

    The Gaza leader of Tawhid and Jihad, Hisham Saidani, was arrested by Hamas’s forces in March.

    The abduction was the first kidnapping of a foreigner in Gaza since Hamas, an Islamic militant group, took control of the territory in June 2007. It was likely to embarrass Hamas, which has prided itself on restoring security and ending years of armed chaos in Gaza.

    The video, similar to those released by extremists in Iraq and Afghanistan, showed Mr. Arrigoni blindfolded and being held roughly by the hair. Only the outstretched arm of the hidden captor was visible. Mr. Arrigoni was a familiar face in Gaza, where he was better known as Victor. Mr. Arrigoni arrived in Gaza in 2009 on a boat with 40 other activists from the Free Gaza Movement who sailed here to protest a blockade imposed by Israel with Egyptian help. Mr. Arrigoni had been an active participant in demonstrations and rallies against the blockade. The restrictions on the entry of goods overland have eased in recent months, but a strict naval blockade remains in force.

    Mr. Arrigoni was a native of Bulciago, a small town near Lake Como north of Milan. He wrote occasionally for the Italian left-wing daily Il Manifesto, which also had a blog, ’Guerilla Radio, to which he filed dispatches from Gaza. Luigi Ripamonti, the deputy mayor of Bulciago, said that Mr. Arrigoni had been an activist from an early age and had worked in Eastern Europe and Africa before embracing the Palestinian cause.

    “He was a kid who always helped others,” Mr. Ripamonti told Italy’s Sky 24 Television. He added, “Today we lose an Italian citizen, a citizen of Bulciago, and also a Palestinian citizen, because he had married Palestine.” Mr. Arrigoni’s mother Egidia Beretta is the mayor of Bulciago.

    " He has never mixed with powerful people," said Ms. Beretta said in an interview to Italy’s Sky Television. "He lived in an apartment block on the harbor, he used to tell me that at times he could see the Israeli boats from the distance."

    Mr. Arrigoni started traveling the world as soon as he finished college and arrived for the first time in Israel and Palestine in 2002, almost by chance, Ms. Beretta told the Italian news agency ANSA.

    A video of Mr. Arrigoni from his blog broadcast on Italian television showed him saying, “I don’t believe in borders, in barriers, in flags. I think that we all belong, independent of latitude and longitude, to the same family, the human family.”

    In a statement, the Italian Foreign Ministry said it “condemned, in the strongest terms, the cowardly and irrational gesture of violence carried out by extremists indifferent to the value of human life.” It described Mr. Arrigoni as “an innocent person who for some time had been living in that area and following it up close in order to report, with strong personal conviction, the situation of Palestinians in the Gaza strip.”

    In a video on YouTube, Mr. Arrigoni said he came from a family of partisans. “My maternal grandparents fought and died against the occupation, another occupation, the Nazi occupation of Italy,” he said.

    “Probably for this reason it’s in my blood, my DNA, to push and struggle for freedom and human rights,” he added.

    In his last blog post, dated Wednesday , Mr. Arrigoni wrote that four workers had been killed on Tuesday in a tunnel underneath the Rafah border crossing with Egypt. “These tunnels are used to transfer necessary goods that have allowed the survival of the population of Gaza, strangled for four years by the criminal Israeli occupation,” he wrote. The post showed a photo of a man bringing a goat through a tunnel.

    According to Ms. Loffreda, Mr. Arrigoni felt that “he had to document what was going on” in Gaza. “I don’t think anyone was more devoted to this cause,” she said of his online chronicles which had some 9,000 followers.

    The last foreigner kidnapped in Gaza was Alan Johnston, a BBC Gaza correspondent who was captured in March 2007 and held for 114 days. He was released without violence after negotiations between Hamas and his kidnappers, who belonged to a shadowy radical group calling itself the Army of Islam.

    Hamas, which won parliamentary elections in 2006, is itself designated as a terrorist organization by Israel, the United States and the European Union. It has cracked down on smaller, more radical Islamic groups in Gaza since it seized control of the area after a brief, factional war against Fatah, its secularist rival.

    In a statement released hours before Hamas announced the death of the captured man, the Italian Foreign Ministry said that it had been carrying out “the appropriate steps for every intervention to protect our citizen.”

    Hamas officials said in a statement that the house that was stormed Friday morning belonged to a member of the group that released the video. The officials said one suspect had been arrested. The A.P. reported that a policeman said four people had been arrested in another location in connection with the abduction.

    Isabel Kershner contributed reporting from Jerusalem, and Rachel Donadio, Elisabetta Povoledo and Gaia Pianigiani from Rome.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/wo...st/16gaza.html

  29. #89
    Administrator Dreadnaught's Avatar
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    More of a classic Zionut response:

    The Hamas authorities were reluctant on Friday to accuse any Palestinian group of murdering Mr. Arrigoni. Hamas officials suggested possible Israeli involvement, noting that Israel was working to thwart the plans for the upcoming international flotilla.

    “We cannot deny the relation between this incident and an international campaign by the Zionist enemy to restrict the arrival of pro-Palestinian activists,” said Mahmoud Zahar, a Hamas leader in Gaza.

    Hamas vowed to arrest anyone involved in Mr. Arrigoni’s abduction and killing, and Mr. Zahar said that a similar occurrence would not happen again to any foreign journalist or supporter of the Palestinians. “This crime is not in line with our norms as Muslims and Palestinians,” he said.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/16/wo...st/16gaza.html

    MPACUK always has some good stuff:

    Today, 10:20 AM
    JerseyLily

    I think some of them came from outside Jamie and firstly there is a very unfortunate history between Hamas and Salafi groups in Gaza. However, the Salafi groups in Gaza have released a statement saying that they had no involvement at all in this and that killing an innocent human being is not allowed.

    The only people to gain is Israel and even if the actual murderers are Arab I would expect they are collaborators with the state of Israel. That is two high profile activists in two weeks the other one being Juliano mer Khamis, so I would suspect it is a campaign by Israel to stop very high profile activists and to scare people from joining the flotilla and to scare other activists into coming, however neither will work.

    [...another post at 10:43...]We all know that Israel is capable of murder and assassination to further its aims so there is no reason to believe that muslims killed the settlers and the fact that no one is claiming responsibility for the bus bombing is highly suspect.

    http://forum.mpacuk.org/showthread.php?t=48887

  30. #90
    All Worship Ragnarök Loki's Avatar
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    Hope is the denial of reality

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