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Thread: Voter Photo ID -- Is It Really Terrible?

  1. #421
    Proof of identity is less about you and more about where you come from. For passports we consider it proof of citizenship. It allows them to trace your claims through your parents, hospital birth records, etc.
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  2. #422
    What's going to distinguish the children born at home (not at hospitals) from the children born at the border (or to undocumented immigrants)? See how that works for the fear factor folks?

    Voter Photo ID isn't just about protecting voting integrity. It means proving identity. I don't think my own grandparents could do that, but since they were borne at home (just like GHW Bush) and they were white, they got a leg up on blacks that also used midwives for births (but didn't get official Birth Certificates). Institutional, entrenched white preference = racism

    The stain persists

  3. #423
    There is almost always documentation of some sort. midwives, child wellness check ups, school attendance, even family bibles can be used as proof of birth and family. Now as we've seen here there are reports concerning the texas regional office of possibly malicious denials concerning the secondary proof, even for people who already have passports, but thats not how things are supposed to go according to my training.
    Last edited by Ominous Gamer; 11-29-2018 at 04:43 PM.
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  4. #424
    Are you seriously suggesting there are no records of people born at home GGT?

    Here it is the law that all births, deaths and marriages must be registered and these records are well maintained and in the public domain dating back I believe over a thousand years.

    I'd be amazed if your records don't go back to your grandparents.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ominous Gamer View Post
    Being upset is understandable, but be upset at yourself for poor planning, not at the world by acting like a spoiled bitch during an interview.

  5. #425
    Not so much no records, but legimate proof that you were born in the USA. in Florida people fly in and induce, but in Texas the mere suggestion that someone was born a few hundred feet to the south is enough to give racists like lewk high blood pressure.
    Last edited by Ominous Gamer; 11-30-2018 at 03:11 AM.
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  6. #426
    In this country a birth certificate is proof. End of story.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ominous Gamer View Post
    Being upset is understandable, but be upset at yourself for poor planning, not at the world by acting like a spoiled bitch during an interview.

  7. #427
    Quote Originally Posted by RandBlade View Post
    Are you seriously suggesting there are no records of people born at home GGT?
    It can be difficult to get birth certificates for home births, depending on the state. When a midwife assists, some states won't accept their witness signature unless they also prove they're licensed/registered providers. Many poor and/or immigrant women never see a doctor for prenatal care, and they use lay midwives for home births....all perfectly legal, but then it's hard to prove the birth was in the US.

    Here it is the law that all births, deaths and marriages must be registered and these records are well maintained and in the public domain dating back I believe over a thousand years.

    I'd be amazed if your records don't go back to your grandparents.
    The registration and record-keeping has changed a lot since then. You can't just show up at the court house and get a birth certificate for a newborn, with a required 'witness' signature from another family member or non-professional.

    As OG said, it can still be difficult for older people to prove they were born here, if they don't have the traditional hospital/doctor signed certificate. My grandpa was born at home in 1898. Back then a doctor made a house call to sign the Live Certificate of Birth (or whatever it was called), and that was used to officially register with the state.

    I'm not sure when the official raised seal copy started, but it was a pain in the ass (and wasn't cheap) when I had to get one, especially out-of-state.

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