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Thread: What is making you happy right now

  1. #5791
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aimless View Post
    Wow, talk about drawing far-reaching conclusions
    It describes the real life experience of every fat person I know to a tie. Including myself. Anecdotal I know, but I also know I'm not alone.

    If you have any doubts about my weight loss experiences; I can tell you that after age 21 I have had every weight on the scale between 72kg and 140 kg. Losing 30% of my body weight over the run of a year? Done that. Increasing my body weight by 50% in the same time span? Been there. Learning about internal and external motivation? Yep. I can probably devise effective and delicious diets making you lose 10kg over 10 weeks.

    I understand that feeling of satisfaction over your recent successes, I advise you you however not to slam the real life experience of other people just because you are pulling your belt a notch tighter for as long as it lasts.

    It makes you sound like a smoker friend of mine who says that quitting smoking is easy; he's done it lots of times.
    Last edited by Hazir; 08-13-2019 at 08:42 AM.
    Greece shows us that there is a kind of politician worse than the ones that break their election promises; the ones that keep their election promises.

  2. #5792
    I was referring to this:

    That kind of roller-coaster weight gain/loss isn't any 'healthier' than carrying around extra pounds, in fact it may be worse in the long run because it totally confuses the body's metabolism.
    The claims about a purported negative health impact, and the explanation offered, are both questionable.

    As for anecdotal experience, I have certainly gained weight after losing it a couple of times in my life, but less than half of what I've lost, and only over a long time. Two steps forward and one step back equals one step forward.

    Haters gonna hate, but I encourage my patients' repeated attempts to quit smoking, because I know that many of them will eventually succeed, just as many of my family, friends, colleagues and patients have. Some people have a pessimistic and defeatist outlook on life that makes them regard repeated failures as an indication of utter cosmic soul-crushing futility; they cultivate a cynical persona to protect themselves from the booboos of their own and their loved ones' failures. For my part, I've seen enough successes after repeated failures to be convinced that repeated failures are often better regarded as proxies for repeated promising attempts, which is indicative both of a determination that can be cultivated, and of the feasibility of tasks that may initially seem futile.

    Every single successful entrepreneur in my life has failed repeatedly before succeeding. My own life has been a string of setbacks and failures followed by success. Of course, I have also seen the other alternative, and there has been no shortage of people who have utterly destroyed their lives, seemingly with no hope of recovery.

    All of this is anecdotal evidence, and it can be interpreted in different ways. How we choose to interpret it, and how we act on that interpretation, is more indicative of personality and of philosophical idiosyncrasies than of any incontrovertible truth about reality. So be a hater for now if you wish, but I love you and I have faith that you can change one day if you just keep trying
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  3. #5793
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    You really think you know me, don't you?

    Another thing I was thinking; wow, defensive much this morning?
    Greece shows us that there is a kind of politician worse than the ones that break their election promises; the ones that keep their election promises.

  4. #5794
    Bye Felicia
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  5. #5795
    I'm down 5 kg this summer, was almost up at 80 kg 1½ year ago and that was my max weight while on cancer treatment.
    I have also been down to 72 kg in that 18 month period. Currently at 73 kg with more muscles.
    I want to get down to 65-68 kg but not sure that is realistic or even wanted.

    My happyness is mostly that I give/take myself the time to run and workout right now.
    I need to try to mentain this even if family life becomes harder, and that is my true challenge.

  6. #5796
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    I rode my bike to work and back. Took me an hour both ways and it felt like a heavy work out, but I really feel good about having done this.
    Greece shows us that there is a kind of politician worse than the ones that break their election promises; the ones that keep their election promises.

  7. #5797
    Quote Originally Posted by Aimless View Post
    I was referring to this:

    "That kind of roller-coaster weight gain/loss isn't any 'healthier' than carrying around extra pounds, in fact it may be worse in the long run because it totally confuses the body's metabolism".

    The claims about a purported negative health impact, and the explanation offered, are both questionable.

    As for anecdotal experience..... <snip>.
    I was just looking at your dessert pics in another thread, so don't criticize my (sister's) anecdotal experience as "far-reaching" while portraying yours as "normal".

    I was gonna let this go b/c it's the "Happy Thread", but then you went on about your patients, and how you want them to succeed. Well, you can't help your patients if you don't understand where they're coming from. What might seem "far-reaching" to you is probably an every-day struggle to others, so don't belittle their reality!


    My sister has struggled with weight her whole life. She's been given all sorts of reasons for it, and tried all sorts of "methods" to change it, but the most destructive thing has been the up/down yo-yo effect. Maybe you focused on "metabolism", but it's much more than that. She keeps what she calls her "fat wardrobe" in storage, anticipating a future failure. (The first time she lost weight, she gave her "fat clothes" to charity. But when she gained it all back, she had to buy new clothes. Rinse, repeat. She's also a shopaholic, which makes matters worse.)

    Admitting this was a pattern of behavior destroyed her self-esteem and sense of self-control. It's a constant battle for her. She's constantly made to feel that it's a character flaw. Smoking isn't a good analogy because no one needs to smoke to stay alive. Giving up desserts (like the ones you post) isn't enough, either. FFS, she can't even taste!

    Be careful in your comparisons; words matter. The mere suggestion that people can *change* can be interpreted as they're just not good enough as they are, if they're overweight. That 'standard' is even higher for women.
    Last edited by GGT; 08-18-2019 at 05:13 AM.

  8. #5798
    Nice try, but I wasn't criticizing your sister, nor am I dismissive towards the struggle you describe. My objection was wrt the implied health & physiological claims and nothing more.

    I addressed smoking because Hazir brought it up, but, frankly, the most effective strategies for helping people to quit smoking have a great deal of overlap with helping them make other lifestyle changes, even though smoking may be different wrt health aspects and mechanisms in many ways, including the difference you mention.

    If a patient—or anyone else—expresses a desire to change something about their health, I believe it's important to offer encouragement and support, even though I am—like they are—aware of the pitfalls and risk of failure; there's no shortage of discouraging "realism", but there is typically a clear lack of positive and constructive support. Motivation should be nurtured; ambivalence should be recognized, and, if possible, developed. You may have a different view, but I'm not going to begin discouraging my patients or neglect to pick up on their hopes when I am in a position to do something more constructive.

    I've had many patients tell me that, when they told their doctor or nurse they'd made (or expressed a desire to make) positive lifestyle-changes—eg. quit smoking, exercised more, started eating healthier, lost weight—they were met with indifference or skepticism and pessimism. That is a crushing experience that can make a person feel small, worthless and discouraged; it doesn't cost anything to instead give some sort of positive feedback.

    You're free to have whatever opinions you like on this issue, and I have no doubt your opinions are based on your long experience with both patients and the things you've learned from yourself and your loved ones, but, when it comes to things that that are essentially matters of philosophy, personality, outlook etc... on those matters I fully intend to exercise my discretion and act in accordance with my own judgement until something substantial changes.

    All of us are exceptionally good at telling ourselves and others why something can't be done, and we frequently justify this automatic pessimism as "realism". But the reality is that many things can nevertheless be done, sometimes, by some people—and a realist must be aware of that as well. Now go have a realistic day or whatever flavor of day you prefer.

    For my part, my mother and some good friends are visiting, and I'm enjoying this feeling of being with a bunch of people that I love. It's a good start to our leave. My friends have a 4-mo-old cutie that is just totes adorbs, and they brought a bunch of fresh vegetables—including a bag of the most beautiful chilies—from their parents' farm, so I'll be busy pickling and fermenting today. We visited the farmer's market yesterday and my mother charmed a ton of people there with her decidedly un-Swedish behavior, loved her first encounters with Northern Swedish (esp. Sami) food and made plans to visit a family that makes traditional Swedish flatbread to learn how they make it. As a child, this behavior used to embarrass me deeply, but, as an adult, I can see that she's enjoyed herself much more than I have, so I reckon she's on to something.
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  9. #5799
    Today I finally made the 6,3 mile run again without destroying myself.
    I have cancelled out on the last four attempts. i.e. it feelt pretty good this time but I was quite slow, but that is ok!

    On Friday, if the weather allows it, I want to see if I can double it.

  10. #5800
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    A half Marathon? Count me impressed if you manage. And still a tip of the hat for trying if you don't.
    Greece shows us that there is a kind of politician worse than the ones that break their election promises; the ones that keep their election promises.

  11. #5801
    Let sleeping tigers lie Khendraja'aro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rille View Post
    Today I finally made the 6,3 mile run again without destroying myself.
    I have cancelled out on the last four attempts. i.e. it feelt pretty good this time but I was quite slow, but that is ok!

    On Friday, if the weather allows it, I want to see if I can double it.
    Well done!

    I myself am still working up to running continuously - turns out that I have a problem with both my "musculus extensor digitorum longus". If I try to run more than one kilometer they simply become exhausted and burn like hell (took some time to figure it out - there are no other problems with my muscles, the bones, nerves or the way I run (certified by various doctors and a video analysis of me running)). So I'm currently doing interval running which means that I'm doing a 300 meter run, then 300 meter walking, then 300 meter running again and so on.

    I thus have arrived at a point where it doesn't feel like my legs will fall off after 4 kilometers and may try to reduce the walking "pauses" soon.
    When the stars threw down their spears
    And watered heaven with their tears:
    Did he smile his work to see?
    Did he who made the lamb make thee?

  12. #5802
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    Quote Originally Posted by Khendraja'aro View Post
    Well done!

    I myself am still working up to running continuously - turns out that I have a problem with both my "musculus extensor digitorum longus". If I try to run more than one kilometer they simply become exhausted and burn like hell (took some time to figure it out - there are no other problems with my muscles, the bones, nerves or the way I run (certified by various doctors and a video analysis of me running)). So I'm currently doing interval running which means that I'm doing a 300 meter run, then 300 meter walking, then 300 meter running again and so on.

    I thus have arrived at a point where it doesn't feel like my legs will fall off after 4 kilometers and may try to reduce the walking "pauses" soon.
    That's an odd place for an injury (if I can call it that).
    Greece shows us that there is a kind of politician worse than the ones that break their election promises; the ones that keep their election promises.

  13. #5803
    Let sleeping tigers lie Khendraja'aro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hazir View Post
    That's an odd place for an injury (if I can call it that).
    It's not an injury per se - I don't know what to call it. I've had this condition since I was 12 (at least that's my first memory of it - probably because that's when school sport started to make us run longer distances). During school it didn't pop up too often (so I simply put it down to lacking exercise) and I also did sports where I didn't have to run very much (like Karate, Judo or Capoeira).

    It's also not as if the muscles are atrophied or something - I can walk seemingly forever. It's just running which starts the problem. The training regimen (and proper running shoes and customized inlays) seems to be improving things - not very fast, mind, but improve it does.
    When the stars threw down their spears
    And watered heaven with their tears:
    Did he smile his work to see?
    Did he who made the lamb make thee?

  14. #5804
    Quote Originally Posted by Aimless View Post
    Nice try, but I wasn't criticizing your sister, nor am I dismissive towards the struggle you describe. My objection was wrt the implied health & physiological claims and nothing more.
    I said that fluctuating weight and yo-yo dieting can be just as harmful as obesity. Plenty of studies confirm that, especially when they highlight eating disorders. Your objection is overruled.



    I had a fantastic visit with my adult sons in Pitt. We went to the Zoo, had a nice dinner on 'the strip', and saw the awesome city lights from Mt. Washington. We laughed a lot, that was the best part.

  15. #5805
    Quote Originally Posted by Hazir View Post
    A half Marathon? Count me impressed if you manage. And still a tip of the hat for trying if you don't.
    Yeah, well, of course I failed that today.
    I did reach 15 km (~9 miles).

    I'm not really happy about that since that wouldn't really be much rille to be satisfied with something he has done.
    But I'll accept it for now and try again... maybe in 2 weeks, might have to run shorter distances next week in order to recover.

    But I like running and have done that before.
    Just that I was really weak after the transplant.

  16. #5806
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  17. #5807
    The Ashes . . . after the incredible World Cup.

    Taken from somewhere else:
    This summer is Stokes' good karma for missing an Ashes tour due to a pair of drunk, homophobic neanderthals abusing innocent, gay drinkers, headbutting Ben's fist and then complaining to the police.

    There is a God.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ominous Gamer View Post
    Being upset is understandable, but be upset at yourself for poor planning, not at the world by acting like a spoiled bitch during an interview.

  18. #5808
    Why would that make you happy?

  19. #5809
    Spent most of the day with my kids, at the public paddling pool. Bumped into a few friends while we were out. Happy and tired children by the end of the day.
    Some people are too dense to bother with

  20. #5810
    My son got the job he's been dreaming about for a long time -- cooking in a professional kitchen, at the flag ship restaurant of a James Beard awarded chef that he greatly admires. Happy and Proud, can't get much better than that!

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