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Thread: What's cookin' ?

  1. #331
    Senior Member GGT's Avatar
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    The ethnic Thanksgiving meal turned out to be less about the food than the family dynamics. OMG, why are vegans so irritating? And why doesn't everyone know that more than two women in the kitchen is a bad idea?

    minx, are you talking about poached eggs?

  2. #332
    SEÑOR Member Aimless's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GGT View Post
    OMG, why are vegans so irritating?
    Because they're hungry

    And why doesn't everyone know that more than two women in the kitchen is a bad idea?
    It only works if they're really in sync or if one of them acts like the other one is the boss.

    minx, are you talking about poached eggs?
    Nope! Steamed eggs, you can check out videos on youtube if you google "steamed eggs" or "chinese steamed eggs" It's basically a mixture of beaten eggs and stock/water (ratios can be altered according to personal preference) that's steamed in a bowl. You can add various yummies to the bowl before pouring in the egg.
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  3. #333
    Senior Member GGT's Avatar
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    Sounds like eggs added to ramen can be just as delicious as any other recipe using eggs

    I found the perfect recipe for chocolate chip cookies, if anyone is interested.

  4. #334
    Senior Member GGT's Avatar
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    Anticipating a blizzard....I bought meat proteins that could easily be cooked outside, on the grill, by flashlight, when the power goes out. The rest of my pantry could have served its purpose under any conditions, any time of year.

  5. #335
    SEÑOR Member Aimless's Avatar
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    The verdict is in: Jeni's splendid cornstarch-based eggless ice-cream base is hands down the simplest and in many ways best ice-cream base for making ice-cream at home. This week we've made both matcha- and hojicha-flavoured ice-cream and they've both come out absolutely frickin' fantastic. I may be able to improve on the basic recipe a little to better suit our preferences and our equipment but it's pretty damn' good as it is. Coldly recommended
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  6. #336
    Wife has been directed to cut all gluten from her diet by her doctor. Early results are good, but we are going to need some variety thats not bank breaking (fuck Udi).

    Anyone got any suggestions?
    Last edited by Ominous Gamer; 06-09-2016 at 02:30 PM.
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  7. #337
    All Worship Ragnarök Loki's Avatar
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    All glutton?
    Hope is the denial of reality

  8. #338
    blah, 2 typos back to back. don't type and fight with county facilities departments at the same time kids.
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  9. #339
    OG: lots and lots of gluten free recipes out there. Your best approach is to use recipes that are already naturally gluten free or that require minimal substitutions (e.g. if small amounts of flour are used as a binder, it's pretty easy to replace). Making really bread-like things (inc. e.g. pasta) is really not worth the expense (for packaged goods) or hassle (for homemade). We have a friend with celiac disease so we've gotten pretty good at this game.

    Some ideas:

    -Soups are fantastic, they rarely contain anything gluten-y. The most you normally need is a little flour to thicken something up, but it's easily replaced by e.g. corn starch (also works for things like cheese sauces).
    -Protein-heavy dishes work pretty well - the only issue is using off-the-shelf marinades, a number of which are not gluten free. We use spice rubs, mediterranean/middle eastern flavorings, asian-style marinades (you can get GF soy sauce and build something around that), and things like BBQ pulled chicken/beef/etc. Hamburgers and hot dogs and the like can be challenging due to fillers, but some GF options exist, and it is easy to make hamburgers without gluten/bread crumbs. Fish works really well as well - most fish recipes require no or little gluten. Sushi works really well.
    -For sides, just stay away from anything with wheat. Vegetables work really well in a variety of contexts, and if you're craving something starchy there are always options like potatoes au gratin or the like. Bean-based dishes also work pretty well.
    -Salads are easy, just keep an eye on dressings (we always make our own anyways - cheaper and better and only takes a couple minutes). No croutons, but that's hardly a big loss. Starchier salads using quinoa bases are a good option as well - good for lunches etc.
    -Desserts are much more challenging. Our two go-to options are a flourless chocolate cake/torte that uses a small amount of ground almonds in place of the small amount of flour normally in the recipe. The other option is chocolate bark - essentially melt some good quality chocolate and pour into a sheet, sprinkle on various options (we like nuts, craisins, sea salt, etc.), let harden in fridge, break up and serve. There are a lot of GF dessert options out there but I think most of them suck when they're trying too hard to mimic something with gluten - e.g. pies or whatever. If you're in the 'oats don't contain gluten' part of gluten free, you can always do things like apple or cranberry crisps as well, though the recipe will need some finessing.

    The internet is your friend here. You can take nearly any recipe you guys frequently use and Google for 'X gluten free' and you'll likely get at least some decent ideas. One of the advantages of the GF craziness nowadays (despite the fact that 'gluten sensitivity' is probably a crock and only people with legitimate celiac or the like really have an issue) is that there are a lot of options, and it's pretty easy to google to find out if a given packaged food is GF - lots of them are even labeled nowadays. Another advantage is that if you stick to proteins and vegetables, you'll probably have a much healthier diet as well rather than eating a lot of empty (albeit delicious) carbs.
    "When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: Why relativity? And why turbulence? I really believe he will have an answer for the first." - Werner Heisenberg (maybe)

  10. #340
    All Worship Ragnarök Loki's Avatar
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    Seagull, a new English/South Asian delicacy.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-36490552
    Hope is the denial of reality

  11. #341
    Quote Originally Posted by wiggin View Post
    people with legitimate celiac

    Bingo
    Still need blood work but the doctor said its either early onset celiac or a mild case.
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  12. #342
    SEÑOR Member Aimless's Avatar
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    We've continued our experiments with chicken and duck and have determined the following when it comes to either bird:

    - letting the skin dry properly, for over a day, is crucial to getting the best crispy skin. Baking powder helps.

    - properly loosen the skin from the meat

    - cook vertically in a convection oven for the best skin (lets fat drip out properly) or spatchcocked placed over vegetables of your choice for greatest speed and convenience.

    - salt properly

    - injecting flavored brine into the meat is often worth it

    - apply a dry rub under the skin

    As for fish, I have decided that almost all fish dishes, whether raw or cooked, taste better with a little brining/curing.

    We eat a lot more vegetarian dishes than we used to. Observations forthcoming
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  13. #343
    SEÑOR Member Aimless's Avatar
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    Turns out wheat starch is optional when making dumplings. Potato starch and tapioca starch will give you a decent dough. These first ones didn't come out as translucent as the rest of the batch but by the time those were ready I was too hungry to take photos.

    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  14. #344
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    Cauliflower rice: I thought it was just a gimmicky bullshit fad but goddamn is it ever so tasty and also fun to make. Remove the stems from the florets and use the largest grater attachment on your food processor, it takes approximately 1 min to make enough for 2 people. Lightly stir-fry or steam with onions and mushrooms for added flavor.

    Eggs: steamer basket in a small saucepan with a small amount of boiling water, 7 minutes and then cooled as fast as possible (we just run cold water over it for a while). Perfectly set whites that aren't rubbery, perfect yolks that are just a tiny bit runny in the center, super easy to peel (tap each end hard and then the shell practically slides off on its own).

    Fish: also surprisingly easy and tasty to steam. Salt, like, a LOT, let rest for up to 3 mins depending on your preferred consistency, wash off thoroughly, place in a steamer basket on top of mushrooms, onions or vegetables of your choice, maybe add a little soy sauce and then steam (lid on) for a few minutes (like 4 mins maximum). Serve with aforementioned cauliflower rice or green beans sautéed in canola and/or sesame-seed oil over high heat until they begin to brown a little bit (I don't even like green beans but they taste delicious cooked this way, even if they're frozen). If the fish is already prepped this takes 5-10 mins of active work, if not it takes a few minutes more in addition to the time it takes to cure the fish.

    If you have a whole boneless side of fish eg. salmon, and you don't wanna bother with cutting it into portions, cure it, rinse thoroughly, place it skin-side up on a lightly oiled oven-proof tray (maybe with a few sprigs of rosemary underneath if you have it) and then chuck it into the oven. Turn on broiler and set it to max, keep an eye on the fish and when the skin begins to char a little (10 mins in our old oven), remove it from the oven. The skin comes right off, the fish is still juicy and you can serve it with the green beans you just sauteed while the fish cooked.

    Our weeknight meals have become both much less complicated and time-consuming as well as much more satisfying. Two people can make varied, flavorful and healthy meals with less than 15 mins of active work and not too much mess.

    tl;dr: cauliflower rice = good, steaming = good, curing/dry-brining fish = good.
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  15. #345
    SEÑOR Member Aimless's Avatar
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    Lightly cured salmon belly (salt heavily, rinse thoroughly after ca 30 mins, soak in mix of white wine or rice vinegar & nice balsamico, water and a little sugar or syrup), ponzu sauce & toasted hazelnuts, served on cold shirataki noodles with grated daikon, scallions and pickled chili. Ponzu sauce is reasonably easy to make apart from difficulties finding yuzu. We substituted lemon & lime, both juice and zest. Flavored with grated daikon and scallions, it makes for a very tasty condiment that goes well with stronger flavored proteins such as tuna or beef. Shirataki noodles are great whether cold or hot--practically no calories, great texture & consistency, almost impossible to overcook--but in this case they were a bit of a distraction.



    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  16. #346
    Senior Member GGT's Avatar
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    That looks like something from a magazine!

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