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Thread: UK... What the Fuck?

  1. #1

    Default UK... What the Fuck?

    https://www.foxnews.com/world/manche...ooming-scandal

    British authorities knew that a network of predominantly South Asian men was grooming vulnerable children in Manchester, but failed to act to stop dozens of girls from being abused -- according to a damning new report released this week that details yet another Asian grooming scandal in the U.K.

    The report is a harrowing look at how Greater Manchester Police and other local authorities failed to take appropriate action more than 15 years ago, despite getting details of nearly 100 “persons of interest” who were using takeout restaurants as a base to rape and abuse children in care between the ages of 11 and 17. It describes offenders as operating “in plain sight” and hanging around care homes and foster homes in cars as they preyed upon vulnerable children.

    The review refers to “predominantly Asian men” without going into detail about specifics of heritage or other religious or national identities, but elsewhere Margaret Oliver, a detective on the team who had expressed concern about the operation's closure, described the case as men of “largely Pakistani heritage...abusing vulnerable white girls” in Hulme and around Rusholme -- where there are a number of curry and kebab stores along the area's "Curry Mile."

    The report details how all the victims were “young white females” while the perpetrators are “almost exclusively Asian adult males, many of whom are associated via the Asian restaurant trade.”

    The review was commissioned in 2017 by Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham and describes how the men took girls from the homes, plied them with drugs and abused them at “sex parties.”

    Greater Manchester Police launched Operation Augusta to investigate allegations of grooming after the death of Victoria Agoglia, a 15-year-old girl in care who died from a suspected heroin overdose in 2003. The Manchester Evening News reports that Mohammed Yaqoob, 50, was responsible for injecting her with the drug and was later jailed for three-and-a-half years.

    But while the operation identified at least 57 children being exploited and 97 suspects, “very few” potential offenders were brought to justice and the operation was eventually shut down in 2005 because of a perceived need “to remove the resources” rather than because lines of inquiry had been exhausted, the report says.

    “Critically, the problem that Operation Augusta had been set up to tackle, namely the sexual exploitation throughout a wide area of a significant number of children in the care system by predominantly Asian men, had not been addressed,” the review concluded. “Very few of the relevant perpetrators were brought to justice and neither were their activities disrupted.”

    The report includes shocking stories of how children told their carers of the abuse and pleaded to be removed from harm. One child is said to have begged her carers to get her away from Manchester as she was too involved with Asian men and that one “made her do things she didn’t want to.” Another spoke of how she was taken to apartments with friends and was given vodka and cocaine and made to “do whatever they wanted us to do.” The report finds that the children were not protected by the appropriate agencies.

    Additionally, it details how offenders eyed a specific children’s home in Manchester that was used as an emergency placement for children entering the care system and therefore, in the report’s words, “maintained a steady supply of victims.”

    The report comes nearly six years after a report detailing the abuse of more than 1,500 victims in Rotherham shocked Britain and made international headlines. That report, commissioned in 2014, found that children as young as 11 were “raped by multiple perpetrators, abducted, trafficked to other cities in England, beaten and intimidated.”

    In that scandal, about 80 percent of the suspects were of South Asian Muslim backgrounds. Similar gangs have been exposed in Newcastle, Bradford, and Rochdale. The report found that there was a belief that the abuse was ignored by authorities due to a fear of fueling racists.

    "Several councillors interviewed believed that by opening up these issues they could be 'giving oxygen' to racist perspectives that might in turn attract extremist political groups and threaten community cohesion," the Rotherham report said.

    That too appears to have played a role in the Manchester case. An unidentified officer in the report says that they tracked down an offender who was not of Asian heritage. The officer says that what had a “massive input" was that the main offenders were predominantly Asian men and “we were told to try and get other ethnicities.”

    Separately the senior investigating officer said he was aware of “sensitive community issues” around policing in South Manchester, in particular, that the potential offenders were "predominantly adult Asian men from local minority ethnic communities in the area covered by South Manchester Division.” He also said the police had recently dealt with an unrelated case involving Kurdish people that he said had "created community tensions and Augusta was to examine accusations against another minority group."

    While the report says that the office was "categoric that any concerns about creating further community tensions did not influence any of his investigative decisions” it adds that “the impact clearly had to be considered by the gold command group.”

    On Tuesday current Chief Constable Ian Hopkins apologized to those who he said were “let down” by police not investigating the offenses committed against them.

    “I want to say that I am personally disgusted that these children were not cared for and by the awful abuse that they suffered,” he said. “I am committed to doing all we can to ensure that they receive the justice today that they were denied 15 years ago.”

    The report concludes that the Manchester scandal was a "depressingly familiar picture and has been seen in many other towns and cities across the country."

    "However, familiarity makes it no less painful for the survivors involved, and it should in no way detract from the need for them to be given the opportunity to ask that the crimes committed against them now be fully investigated," it says.






    My God what is wrong with the police force in the UK?

    "Several councillors interviewed believed that by opening up these issues they could be 'giving oxygen' to racist perspectives that might in turn attract extremist political groups and threaten community cohesion," the Rotherham report said.

    Are you fucking kidding me? They were OK with child rape and even a child's death over actually doing their job and fixing it because they feared it might threaten "community cohesion?" The names of the people responsible for this atrocious decision making should be published. No bureaucrat should ever enjoy anonymity when making such a heinous decision.

  2. #2
    This has been a long-running controversy now since the story broke nearly a decade ago. If you can get it there was a good (and chilling) documentary into this called Three Girls by the BBC.
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    Being upset is understandable, but be upset at yourself for poor planning, not at the world by acting like a spoiled bitch during an interview.

  3. #3
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    What's a bit lost in the fox story is that vulnerable more than anything is referring to the class the victims belonged to. They weren't taken too seriously because of the British police being heavily prejudiced against their version of 'white trash'.
    Greece shows us that there is a kind of politician worse than the ones that break their election promises; the ones that keep their election promises.

  4. #4
    Yeah this is depressing on various levels.

    How long it went on before it was detected
    How long it took for the ring to be brought to justice
    How prevalent vulnerable young girls seem to be in various communities, and the extent to which the welfare state seems unable/unwilling to help them
    And also that it seems to still be going on, with police forces and the welfare state too short of resource and budget to do much about it beyond scratch the surface of the issue
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    It's actually the original French billion, which is bi-million, which is a million to the power of 2. We adopted the word, and then they changed it, presumably as revenge for Crecy and Agincourt, and then the treasonous Americans adopted the new French usage and spread it all over the world. And now we have to use it.

    And that's Why I'm Voting Leave.

  5. #5
    Investigators found that a number of people involved expressed a belief that mentioning or focusing on the ethnicity of the perpetrators might be seen as racist, which is not the same as believing that helping the victims - or, indeed, helping to bring the perpetrators to justice - would be seen as racist. Classism, racism and dysfunctional institutions all contributed to the decades-long failure to protect victims - classism b/c of the social status of the victims, racism b/c of the practice of leaving matters involving the Pakistani community in the area to councilors of Pakistani origin, and institutional dysfunction b/c of a culture of silence, excessive case-loads, failure to share info, etc. Almost nobody cared about these victims for years. You wouldn't have, either; let's be honest - you're only bringing up this story because it popped up on some racist website and tickled your race war fetish.

    There are so many things to be truly outraged & disgusted about, in this scandal, that your fixation on a self-reported fear of being seen as racist for focusing on the ethnicity of the perpetrators seems like truly niche interest. Officials' reluctance to focus on perpetrators' ethnicity, in their commentary, is a non-issue when officials don't care about protecting vulnerable victims in the first place; the latter is the real problem that can and must be addressed, whereas the former is mostly of interest to fetishists and kooks (outside of a police investigation, ofc).
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
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  6. #6
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    Are you seriously talking down the level of outrage and disgust this scandal deserve?

    The simple fact that racists use this case as a justification for their ideology doesn't reduce in the least the fact that race did play a role in the way it was dealt with by the police.
    Greece shows us that there is a kind of politician worse than the ones that break their election promises; the ones that keep their election promises.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Hazir View Post
    Are you seriously talking down the level of outrage and disgust this scandal deserve?
    No.
    Last edited by Aimless; 01-23-2020 at 04:42 PM.
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

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