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Thread: covid-19

  1. #3691
    Quote Originally Posted by Lewkowski View Post
    What would it take for you to be convinced that they made a bad decision? What would it take for you to begin to distrust the CDC? Like if the weatherman told us there was a 90% chance of rain 20 days in a row and there wasn't rain in 20 days I'm not going to be putting any confidence in what he's saying but I'm curious as to what your threshold for the doubting of an establishment institution is for you.
    Weird analogy.

    Yeah, there are people who don't "trust" the National Weather Service or NOAA when they issue severe weather watches & warnings for *increased risk* of flash floods, tropical storm winds, hurricanes, tornadoes, etc. Those agencies have all the modern weather science tools, aggregate data -- and even a view from space -- to make really accurate *predictions*; but some people will still ignore (or even flaunt) local evacuation orders and hold storm parties. Since they've been thru plenty of storms and done just fine, the forecasters must be wrong.

    It's not just faulty risk analysis (to think you know better than the experts), but selfish. And disrespectful of first-responders and rescue teams who'll risk their own lives to save even the reckless, feckless, cowboys who don't give a damn about anything or anyone if it comes from an "establishment institution".

    If folks are doubting experts *just because they're experts*, that "anti-establishment" bend is a flawed political decision, and not in their best self-interest.

  2. #3692
    Quote Originally Posted by wiggin View Post
    2021 update: one of the advisory board members is now on ACIP. So, that's encouraging.

    I can't imagine what it would be like if I was sending my kids to school in a place like FL or TX.
    You live in an area with all sorts of "experts" where people appreciate and embrace "expertise" in medical, societal, and political ways.

    I can't imagine how hard this must be for all the parents with young school-aged kids, let alone the medical professionals, hospital admins, and all the ancillary staff...who live in states with draconian anti-mask/anti-vaccine policies.

  3. #3693
    Should we make a separate thread for COVID Darwin Award nominations?

    Police Captain Chooses Quick Death Rather than a Long Drawn Out Life

    Unfortunately, he may have already contaminated the gene pool; article didn't say if he had children.
    .

  4. #3694
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  5. #3695
    Three more nominees to add to this year's list for Darwin awards...

    Who Could've Known?
    .

  6. #3696
    Quote Originally Posted by Aimless View Post

    Idiocy but the judge was right to rule the way they did. The justiciable issue is that the hospital pharmacy was refusing to fill a valid prescription for a regular dosage of a drug that's FDA-approved for human use from a properly licensed physician. The problem here is that she found an irresponsible doctor that is promoting it as a course of treatment for Covid. Why is it these quacks keep settling on anti-parasitics for their snake oil?
    Last night as I lay in bed, looking up at the stars, I thought, “Where the hell is my ceiling?"

  7. #3697
    Myrrh is an antiparasitic and I don't see quacks promoting that for Covid treatment. Maybe a clue?
    .

  8. #3698
    Quote Originally Posted by Being View Post
    Myrrh is an antiparasitic and I don't see quacks promoting that for Covid treatment.
    Yet.
    Last night as I lay in bed, looking up at the stars, I thought, “Where the hell is my ceiling?"

  9. #3699
    No money in it.
    .

  10. #3700
    Quote Originally Posted by LittleFuzzy View Post
    Idiocy but the judge was right to rule the way they did. The justiciable issue is that the hospital pharmacy was refusing to fill a valid prescription for a regular dosage of a drug that's FDA-approved for human use from a properly licensed physician. The problem here is that she found an irresponsible doctor that is promoting it as a course of treatment for Covid. Why is it these quacks keep settling on anti-parasitics for their snake oil?
    I obviously don't know Ohio law, but my understanding had been that in many jurisdictions pharmacists do have some leeway to refuse to fill prescriptions for a variety of reasons (including a belief it will be harmful to the patient - e.g. opioids - or moral beliefs - e.g. contraception). So there may have been a legitimate argument against filling out the prescription. I suspect there's a much better argument in favor of revoking the doctor's license to practice medicine.
    "When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: Why relativity? And why turbulence? I really believe he will have an answer for the first." - Werner Heisenberg (maybe)

  11. #3701
    Quote Originally Posted by LittleFuzzy View Post
    Idiocy but the judge was right to rule the way they did. The justiciable issue is that the hospital pharmacy was refusing to fill a valid prescription for a regular dosage of a drug that's FDA-approved for human use from a properly licensed physician. The problem here is that she found an irresponsible doctor that is promoting it as a course of treatment for Covid. Why is it these quacks keep settling on anti-parasitics for their snake oil?
    Since when does a doctor who doesn't have admitting privileges to a hospital get to tell a hospital how to treat a patient?
    Hope is the denial of reality

  12. #3702
    https://www.miamiherald.com/news/cor...253796898.html

    God how I hate how dishonest my state's government has become.
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  13. #3703
    Quote Originally Posted by wiggin View Post
    I obviously don't know Ohio law, but my understanding had been that in many jurisdictions pharmacists do have some leeway to refuse to fill prescriptions for a variety of reasons (including a belief it will be harmful to the patient - e.g. opioids - or moral beliefs - e.g. contraception). So there may have been a legitimate argument against filling out the prescription. I suspect there's a much better argument in favor of revoking the doctor's license to practice medicine.

    There is specific law for religious objections, I know. The patient being in intensive care carves away some of the discretion that might otherwise be afforded the pharmacist in other cases though. Because the patient isn't free to seek treatment elsewhere in the event of a conflict.
    Last night as I lay in bed, looking up at the stars, I thought, “Where the hell is my ceiling?"

  14. #3704
    We've had pharmacists deny us prescriptions in the past for our pets because they were commonly abused by addicts. We even had trouble buying basic syringes. I stopped trying to fill them and had mom pick them up alone.
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  15. #3705
    Quote Originally Posted by Ominous Gamer View Post
    https://www.miamiherald.com/news/cor...253796898.html

    God how I hate how dishonest my state's government has become.
    That's basically what Georgia did during the first wave.
    Hope is the denial of reality

  16. #3706
    https://www.abcactionnews.com/news/n...-to-face-fines
    Look at that small government work it's magic
    "In a field where an overlooked bug could cost millions, you want people who will speak their minds, even if they’re sometimes obnoxious about it."

  17. #3707
    Quote Originally Posted by Ominous Gamer View Post
    We've had pharmacists deny us prescriptions in the past for our pets because they were commonly abused by addicts. We even had trouble buying basic syringes. I stopped trying to fill them and had mom pick them up alone.

    And I expect that's been substantially cheaper for you than getting a lawyer would have been
    Last night as I lay in bed, looking up at the stars, I thought, “Where the hell is my ceiling?"

  18. #3708
    Quote Originally Posted by wiggin View Post
    I suspect there's a much better argument in favor of revoking the doctor's license to practice medicine.
    Bingo! Where the hell is the AMA, the American Board of Emergency Medicine, or any other professional medical guild that relies on *certification and licensure* to protect their reputation....and weed out the quacks?! Where's the JCAH in all this?

    It’s unclear why the hospital didn’t mount any defense under a new law passed in the state budget this summer that grants health care providers the “freedom to decline to perform” any service which violates their “conscience,” as informed by moral, ethical or religious beliefs.
    FFS, the lack of scientific data should be enough. What's next? Hospital pharmacists being required to dispense garlic and turmeric as cancer treatments, or Veterinarians getting admitting privileges?

  19. #3709
    Didn't think that ivermectin decision would stand: https://www.thedailybeast.com/ohio-j...-on-ventilator
    Hope is the denial of reality

  20. #3710
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  21. #3711
    I may disagree with the reversal of the Ohio decision but THAT . . .
    Last night as I lay in bed, looking up at the stars, I thought, “Where the hell is my ceiling?"

  22. #3712
    Quote Originally Posted by Aimless View Post

    what
    Did you expect us to experiment on law abiding citizens?
    .

  23. #3713
    This is a very good interviewer. These are also incredibly dumb people:



    around 4m30s in
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  24. #3714
    Quote Originally Posted by Aimless View Post
    This is a very good interviewer. These are also incredibly dumb people
    She's done other very good interviews with the Evangelical Christian community, especially in the Southern Bible Belt, trying to understand why some people listen to pastors instead of physicians.

    Did you catch the church sign "Except the Lord" misspelling in the background?

  25. #3715
    PS, The US if filled with stupid people! And it's not just relegated to the Bible Belt or southern states. In one of the wealthiest and highly educated suburbs of Philly, the Bucks County school board meeting (in my sister's district) devolved into a shouting match with physical threats. She was surprised that so many "well-educated parents" were fighting a mask mandate in schools, but I wasn't.

    Even rich people can be infected by teh stupid, and disinformation from social media. That's our most dangerous virus....for which there's no clear treatment or cure.

  26. #3716
    UK hospitalizations still holding somewhat steady despite ongoing surge in case numbers. Children will be a big issue moving forward, I expect. Meanwhile, Swedish govt has been advised by the public health agency to lift what few restrictions there are by the end of the month, and the agency itself will no longer recommend wfh. Case numbers have been steadily rising in almost all age-groups except 20-29-y-olds—which I'm gonna guess reflects young adults' disinclination to get tested. Only people aged 16 and up will be eligible for vaccination. Regional authorites have varied considerably wrt the clownishness of their vaccination programmes, with some having found great success in vaccinating high-schoolers by just giving them an appointment, and others having found great success in failing to vaccinate people by making it difficult to secure an appointment. My region has fared well in comparison to pretty much all others—we have only 2 hospitalized patients, one of which is in ICU. We're all busy trying to work off the accumulated healthcare debt.

    Quote Originally Posted by GGT View Post
    She's done other very good interviews with the Evangelical Christian community, especially in the Southern Bible Belt, trying to understand why some people listen to pastors instead of physicians.

    Did you catch the church sign "Except the Lord" misspelling in the background?
    Ah no I missed that, do you remember how many minutes in it was?
    “Humanity's greatest advances are not in its discoveries, but in how those discoveries are applied to reduce inequity.”
    — Bill Gates

  27. #3717
    The County Health Department here has started issuing gift cards (with help from sponsors) at the walk-in centers as an incentive to get vaccinated.
    Last night as I lay in bed, looking up at the stars, I thought, “Where the hell is my ceiling?"

  28. #3718
    Quote Originally Posted by Aimless View Post
    Ah no I missed that, do you remember how many minutes in it was?
    At 6:55. The CNN banner obscures the rest of the sign, but pretty sure they meant to say "Accept the Lord".

    Since you mentioned accumulated healthcare debt....

    (CNN) -- A new analysis published Tuesday estimates that preventable costs for treating hospitalized, unvaccinated Covid-19 patients reached $5.7 billion over the last three months.

    This most recent data takes into account the surge in hospitalizations seen in August, which study authors estimate accounted for $3.7 billion of preventable spending alone.

    The data analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation found, using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, as well as studies on health care costs, that each preventable Covid-19 hospitalization costs about $20,000.

    According to KFF's analysis of data from the US Department of Health and Human Services and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the US saw 287,000 preventable Covid-19 hospitalizations from June to August.

    The study authors used "preventable" hospitalizations to refer to hospitalizations of unvaccinated adults for Covid-19 treatment primarily, while accounting for any post-vaccination infections that would have been expected if this population had been vaccinated.

    These numbers together yield a total of $5.7 billion spent on preventable hospitalizations over three months. The study authors said this number is likely a conservative estimate of costs.

    "This ballpark figure is likely an understatement of the cost burden from preventable treatment of Covid-19 among unvaccinated adults," the authors said.

    The study did not account for outpatient care costs, and some data indicates inpatient health care costs for Covid-19 treatment may be higher than the $20,000 figure used.

    "Additionally, although breakthrough infections and hospitalizations are rare, unvaccinated people are also more likely to spread the virus to those who have taken measures to protect themselves and others, and those costs are not included in these estimates," the authors wrote.

    The-CNN-Wire


  29. #3719
    I know I go overboard once in a while but I feel the vax refusers are Typhoid Marys and should be locked up on secluded islands away from responsible people who do stuff like wash their hands after wiping their ass.
    .

  30. #3720
    Those "secluded islands" will be underwater soon, so the anti-vaxxers will just be part of a weird group denouncing teh federal gummint while also demanding it protects their independence and FREEEEDOM.

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